1. reblogged: kqedscience

    kqedscience:

    Glenn Gould In Rapture

    What’s going on here, I can only guess, but here’s what you’re about to see: In the video below, the great musician Glenn Gould, supreme interpreter of Bach, is sitting at his living room piano on a low, low chair, his nose close to the keys. He’s at his Canadian country house in his bathrobe.

    Through the window, you catch snatches of his back yard. It’s a windy day and he’s got a coffee cup sitting on the piano top. He’s working on a Bach partita, not just playing it, but singing along in his swinging baritone. As he plays, he gets so totally, totally lost in the music that suddenly (1:57 from the top), smack in the middle of a passage, with no warning, for no apparent reason, his left hand flips up, touches his head; he stands up, and walks in what looks like a trance to the window. There’s an eerie silence. Then, in the quiet, you hear the Bach leaking out of him. He’s still playing it, but in his head, he’s scatting the beats. Then he turns, wanders back, sits down, and his fingers pick up right where his voice left off, but now with new energy, like he’s found a switch and switched it.

    What just happened?”

    Learn about the science behind “the flow state” from NPR’s Robert Krulwich.

     
  2. Sep 10th, 2014     sciencemusicflow statenpr
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  3. the-dragonblades-shadow:

    sizvideos:

    Video

    //This began the rise of Aperture Science.

     
  4. Sep 3rd, 2014     sciencecoatingline-xstrengthnational geographic
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  5. reblogged: amnhnyc

    amnhnyc:

    The weekend has arrived! Arachnophobes and ’philes alike will get a kick out the live animal exhibition Spiders Alive! See 20 species of live arachnids, get a close up view in the live spider presentations, and hop up on the climbable trapdoor spider. Learn more. 

    This week you may have missed:

    Have a great weekend!

     
  6. Aug 27th, 2014     sciencespidersarachnidsamnhamerican museum of natural historyexhibitbiology
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  7.    2

     

    How did scientists snap such a beautiful image of the blood vessels in a pig heart? They filled them with liquid gallium! 
Over at Medium, the Physics Arxiv blog has a full account of the study:

"Conventional contrast agents are based on iodine because it has a high electron density and so absorbs x-rays. A more effective way to absorb X-rays is by using a denser fluid. But until now nobody had tried the obvious solution: using a liquid metal.
That’s where Qian and co come in. These guys have tried it for the first time with gallium, a metal which melts at about 29 degrees centigrade and so is liquid at body temperature. Gallium is also chemically stable and does not react with water at this temperature and so ought to flow easily through the vessels.”

Go read the whole thing!
HT Gizmodo

    How did scientists snap such a beautiful image of the blood vessels in a pig heart? They filled them with liquid gallium! 

    Over at Medium, the Physics Arxiv blog has a full account of the study:

    "Conventional contrast agents are based on iodine because it has a high electron density and so absorbs x-rays. A more effective way to absorb X-rays is by using a denser fluid. But until now nobody had tried the obvious solution: using a liquid metal.

    That’s where Qian and co come in. These guys have tried it for the first time with gallium, a metal which melts at about 29 degrees centigrade and so is liquid at body temperature. Gallium is also chemically stable and does not react with water at this temperature and so ought to flow easily through the vessels.”

    Go read the whole thing!

    HT Gizmodo

     
  8. Aug 20th, 2014     sciencephysicsbiologyphysics arxiv blogarxiv
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  9. fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

    Paint seems to dance and leap when vibrated on a speaker. Propelled upward, the liquid stretches into thin sheets and thicker ligaments until surface tension can no longer hold the the fluid together and droplets erupt from the fountain. Often paints are shear-thinning, non-Newtonian fluids, meaning that their ability to resist deformation decreases as they are deformed. This behavior allows them to flow freely off a brush but then remain without running after application. In the context of vibration, though, shear-thinning properties cause the paint to jump and leap more readily. For more images, see photographer Linden Gledhill’s website. (Photo credit: L. Gledhill; submitted by pinfire)

     
  10. Aug 13th, 2014     sciencephysicssurface tensionspeakervibrationwaves
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  11. reblogged: thesubatomic

    thesubatomic:

The violent reaction between Aluminium and Iodine catalysed in water.

    thesubatomic:

    The violent reaction between Aluminium and Iodine catalysed in water.

     
  12. Aug 6th, 2014     sciencechemistryreaction
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  13. reblogged: 8bitfuture

    8bitfuture:

This is the sunshield on NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope.
This test unit was unfurled to full-size for the first time last week and “worked perfectly”, according to NASA.

The Sunshield is about the length of a tennis court, and will be folded up like an umbrella around the Webb telescope’s mirrors and instruments during launch. Once it reaches its orbit, the Webb telescope will receive a command from Earth to unfold, and separate the Sunshield’s five layers into their precisely stacked arrangement with its kite-like shape.
The Sunshield test unit was stacked and expanded at a cleanroom in the Northrop Grumman facility in Redondo Beach, California.
The Sunshield separates the observatory into a warm sun-facing side and a cold side where the sunshine is blocked from interfering with the sensitive infrared instruments. The infrared instruments need to be kept very cold (under 50 K or -370 degrees F) to operate.   The Sunshield protects these sensitive instruments with an effective sun protection factor or SPF of 1,000,000 (suntan lotion generally has an SPF of 8-50).
In addition to providing a cold environment, the Sunshield provides a thermally stable environment. This stability is essential to maintaining proper alignment of the primary mirror segments as the telescope changes its orientation to the sun.

    8bitfuture:

    This is the sunshield on NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope.

    This test unit was unfurled to full-size for the first time last week and “worked perfectly”, according to NASA.

    The Sunshield is about the length of a tennis court, and will be folded up like an umbrella around the Webb telescope’s mirrors and instruments during launch. Once it reaches its orbit, the Webb telescope will receive a command from Earth to unfold, and separate the Sunshield’s five layers into their precisely stacked arrangement with its kite-like shape.

    The Sunshield test unit was stacked and expanded at a cleanroom in the Northrop Grumman facility in Redondo Beach, California.

    The Sunshield separates the observatory into a warm sun-facing side and a cold side where the sunshine is blocked from interfering with the sensitive infrared instruments. The infrared instruments need to be kept very cold (under 50 K or -370 degrees F) to operate.   The Sunshield protects these sensitive instruments with an effective sun protection factor or SPF of 1,000,000 (suntan lotion generally has an SPF of 8-50).

    In addition to providing a cold environment, the Sunshield provides a thermally stable environment. This stability is essential to maintaining proper alignment of the primary mirror segments as the telescope changes its orientation to the sun.

     
  14. Jul 30th, 2014     sciencespaceastronomynasasunshieldsolarjames webb space telescope
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  15. reblogged: shychemist

    compoundchem:

A look today at the chemicals behind insect repelling sprays.Read more here, including a possible reason why mosquitos just prefer some people more than others: http://wp.me/p4aPLT-mS

    compoundchem:

    A look today at the chemicals behind insect repelling sprays.

    Read more here, including a possible reason why mosquitos just prefer some people more than others: 
    http://wp.me/p4aPLT-mS

     
  16. Jul 23rd, 2014     sciencebiologymosquitoeschemistry
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  17. reblogged: science-junkie

    science-junkie:

    This Is What Math Equations Look Like in 3-D

    via wired.com

     
  18. Jul 16th, 2014     sciencemathmath equationsvisualizationdata visualizationmath visualization
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  19. reblogged: afro-dominicano

    Colonies of Growing Bacteria Make Psychedelic Art

    Images: 1) P. vortex exposed to a chemotherapy substance 2) P. vortex 3) Vortex Blue (P. vortex) 4) A close look at P. dendritiformis 5) Bacterial Dragon (Paenibacillus dendritiformis)

    Israeli physicist Eshel Ben-Jacob uses bacteria as an art medium, shaping colonies in petri dishes into bold patterns

    Awesome! Via Smithsonian Magazine

     
  20. Jul 9th, 2014     sciencebiologybacteriaart
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