1. fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

    Though seemingly instantaneous to the naked eye, the bursting of a soap bubble is fascinating when slowed down. Here it is at about 2200 frames per second. Initially, the bubble is approximately spherical - its shape determined by a balance between surface tension, gravity, and pressure. The prick of a pinpoint disrupts the balance, and surface tension pulls the thin film away from the defect. The liquid sheet of the bubble retracts swiftly into a filament of fluid and a cloud of tiny droplets. (Video credit: soapbubble.dk)

     
  2. Apr 24th, 2014     sciencephysicsfluid dynamicssoap bubblebubblesurface tension
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  3. reblogged: osteogenix

    outreachscience:

    What Gives Summer That Distinct Smell?

    As summer approaches us of the southern hemisphere we look forward to the sunny afternoons, the days at the beach and the smell of freshly mown grass - but what is that smell and why is it so relaxing?

    When grass is cut, fats and phospholipids are broken down into long chain fatty acids, eg. linoelic acid, these fatty acids are then oxidised and chopped up by enzymes to form an end product that is either a six or twelve carbon chain. The six carbon chain molecule is the one responsible for the smell of grass so we shall focus on it. The molecules have a carbonyl group on the end and a double bond three carbons in from the end, and thus using some high school chemistry we can determine that the name of the organic molecule is cis-3-hexanal. Our noses are fantastic tools for discovering molecules and are particularly good at detecting this one; humans can detect cis-3-hexanal at 0.25 parts per billion. Cis-3-hexanal is very unstable and quickly mutates from a cis to trans - a molecule which is known as trans-2-hexanal. This molecule is known as the ‘leaf aldehyde’ and in part of what makes up commercial odours as ‘green odour’.

    Cis-3-hexanal plays a role in many other aspects of life other than the smell of freshly mown grass - is it also important in the smell of strawberries, in the recovery of plants when they are damaged by pests and surprisingly in medicine. Studies have shown that molecules very similar to cis-3-hexanal can have a positive healing effect on the psychological damage caused by stress by activating blood flow in the primary olfactory cortex. So, maybe next time you’re having a rough day, go mow the lawn and spend some time sun bathing on your freshly trimmed grass.

    [Citations]

    It’s so nice out today—I couldn’t resist a post about summer!

     
  4. Apr 22nd, 2014     sciencechemistrysummersmellscentodor
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  5. reblogged: kqedscience

    kqedscience:

In weird Brazilian cave insects, male-female sex organs reversed"This may be the role reversal to end all role reversals.Scientists on Thursday described four insect species that dwell in extremely dry caves in Brazil, feed on bat guano and possess what the researchers called an “evolutionary novelty.” .The females have an elaborate, penis-like organ while the males have a vagina-like opening into which females insert their organ during mating sessions that last 40 to 70 hours, the scientists reported in the journal Current Biology.”
Learn more from reuters.

    kqedscience:

    In weird Brazilian cave insects, male-female sex organs reversed

    "This may be the role reversal to end all role reversals.

    Scientists on Thursday described four insect species that dwell in extremely dry caves in Brazil, feed on bat guano and possess what the researchers called an “evolutionary novelty.” .

    The females have an elaborate, penis-like organ while the males have a vagina-like opening into which females insert their organ during mating sessions that last 40 to 70 hours, the scientists reported in the journal Current Biology.”

    Learn more from reuters.

     
  6. Apr 17th, 2014     sciencebiologycave insectsinsectsgender
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  7. staceythinx:

    Selections from Slate’s fantastic gallery of Incredible Photos of Tiny Animal Partsa collection of some of best animal entries to the Nikon Small World competition last year.

     
  8. Apr 15th, 2014     sciencebiologyslatephotographygooorgeous
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  9. nanodash:

Oooh, sparky…
This is a Jacob’s Ladder, twisted into a double Helix.
To make a Jacob’s Ladder you put two upward pointy bits of metal together and put a high voltage between them. High enough and the electricity can arc through the air by ionising the air Pikachu style.
This ionised air is hot, and it rises, pulling the arc up with it.
Just remember, unless you’re trained, don’t fuck around with electricity. Just don’t.
Linkitylink

    nanodash:

    Oooh, sparky…

    This is a Jacob’s Ladder, twisted into a double Helix.

    To make a Jacob’s Ladder you put two upward pointy bits of metal together and put a high voltage between them. High enough and the electricity can arc through the air by ionising the air Pikachu style.

    This ionised air is hot, and it rises, pulling the arc up with it.

    Just remember, unless you’re trained, don’t fuck around with electricity. Just don’t.

    Linkitylink

     
  10. Apr 10th, 2014     sciencephysicsjacob's laddervoltageelectricityionization
    Comments
  11. nanodash:

nanodash:

This is a sound wave, as represented by fire. Making it the most metal oscilloscope in history.
To be exact, it’s called a Ruben’s Tube. And it’s playing the start of the chorus to Journey’s Any Way You Want It. It must be closing time in the clubs, that’s the only reason they play Journey.
Sound is just air vibrations, as the air vibrates it creates sections of high density air and low density air. The more air, the higher the flame can be. So it translates the sound wave for us. Also fire is pretty.
See how it briefly lapses into a sine wave? That happens when Steve Perry’s dulcet tones occasionally hit one of the harmonics of the pipe, making a standing wave. Which is cool.
This loses something without the sound, so please, go listen to the video here

In case you missed it

    nanodash:

    nanodash:

    This is a sound wave, as represented by fire. Making it the most metal oscilloscope in history.

    To be exact, it’s called a Ruben’s Tube. And it’s playing the start of the chorus to Journey’s Any Way You Want It. It must be closing time in the clubs, that’s the only reason they play Journey.

    Sound is just air vibrations, as the air vibrates it creates sections of high density air and low density air. The more air, the higher the flame can be. So it translates the sound wave for us. Also fire is pretty.

    See how it briefly lapses into a sine wave? That happens when Steve Perry’s dulcet tones occasionally hit one of the harmonics of the pipe, making a standing wave. Which is cool.

    This loses something without the sound, so please, go listen to the video here

    In case you missed it

     
  12. Apr 8th, 2014     ruben's tubesciencephysicswavesineFIREany way you want it
    Comments
  13. reblogged: anjaliauden

    jtotheizzoe:

    Let This Awesome Science Infect Your Mind

    Ed Yong is one of the finest science writers in the world. His National Geographic blog is chock full of the weird, wild, and WTF-inducing stories that make our living world so darn interesting. So I was overjoyed when I heard he would be speaking at this year’s TED.

    He didn’t disappoint. In his talk above, he unlocks the under-appreciated and often cringe-worthy world of mind-controlling parasites. They get no respect, I tell ya, no respect at all. Yet they are cornerstones of countless ecosystems, determining food availability and managing population sizes like armies of freaky fauna, each deployed in a Trojan Horse of evolution’s design. Every parasite’s life is a story, by definition, an elaborate chain that extends from host to host, and I think they’ve found their minstrel in Ed. I mean that as a compliment, of course.

    Listen to him weave a tapestry of tapeworms, explain what makes flamingos munch on zombie shrimp, show you how a cricket is like a TARDIS, how a wasp turns a cockroach into a cocker spaniel, and how a brain-controlling protozoan reminds him of an Elizabeth Gilbert novel. My favorite part of this? The idea that ideas themselves may be parasites.

    I haven’t loved a TED talk this much in a long time. Or maybe that’s just the parasite talking. 

     
  14. Apr 3rd, 2014     scienceted talkparasitesed yong
    Comments
  15.    4

     

    reblogged: paraphyletic

    paraphyletic:

Science News

… “I thought it was very odd to have only one positive emotion,” says cognitive scientist Aleix Martinez of Ohio State University in Columbus.
So he and colleagues came up with 16 combined ones, such as “happily disgusted” and “happily surprised.” Then the researchers asked volunteers to imagine situations that would provoke these emotions, such as listening to a gross joke, or getting unexpected good news.
When the team compared pictures of the volunteers making different faces and analyzed every eyebrow wrinkle, mouth stretch and tightened chin, “what we found was beyond belief,” Martinez says. For each compound emotion, almost everyone used the same facial muscles, the team reports March 31 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences…

More at Science News

    paraphyletic:

    Science News

    … “I thought it was very odd to have only one positive emotion,” says cognitive scientist Aleix Martinez of Ohio State University in Columbus.

    So he and colleagues came up with 16 combined ones, such as “happily disgusted” and “happily surprised.” Then the researchers asked volunteers to imagine situations that would provoke these emotions, such as listening to a gross joke, or getting unexpected good news.

    When the team compared pictures of the volunteers making different faces and analyzed every eyebrow wrinkle, mouth stretch and tightened chin, “what we found was beyond belief,” Martinez says. For each compound emotion, almost everyone used the same facial muscles, the team reports March 31 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

    More at Science News

     
  16. Apr 1st, 2014     sciencepsychologyfacial recognitionfacial expressionsproceedings of the national academy of sciences
    Comments
  17. reblogged: freshphotons

     
  18. Mar 27th, 2014     sciencebiologywater fleadaphnia manga
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  19. plant-a-day:

    Sensitive Plant

    Mimosa pudica

    "Pudica" is the Latin word for "shy" or "bashful," which is an apt description of the sensitive "Touch-Me-Not." Native to South and Central America, this shade-lover often grows as a weed under trees and shrubs. It is popular among collectors as a specimen plant worldwide, because of its unique sensitivity to touch.

    The foliage retracts when touched to prevent consumption by herbivores, and it also exhibits nyctinastic movement, meaning its circadian rhythms affect its leafs to close at night, and re-open during the day. 

    This trait is present in many other members of the legume family as well.

    You can buy seeds for this plant and grow it yourself:

    Canada / USA / UK & Europe / Worldwide

    ——

    - biodiverseed

     
  20. Mar 25th, 2014     sciencebiologymimosa pudicatouch me notplants
    Comments