1. You’ve probably read that Arctic ice is melting way faster than we thought it would. But you might not have heard of the NASA program monitoring the ice loss.
IEEE Spectrum has a great article on the IceBridge mission, which measures the Arctic topography by sending laser altimeters on airplane flights. And the IceBridge findings paint a disturbing picture of the Arctic’s future.

In discussing some of the recent IceBridge data at the American Geophysical Union (AGU) meeting in December, [research scientist Andrew] Barrett asked what he called a “rather crass” and “somewhat simplistic” question: “When are we going to see an ice-free Arctic Ocean?” He then answered his own question, saying that fewer than 50 percent of the models show an ice-free Arctic before 2060. But he suggests that 2030 may be a reasonable guess, given most recent observations. (Researchers treat anything below 1 million km2 as “ice-free.”)
 

Head over to IEEE Spectrum for the full story.
Photo courtesy of The Asahi Shinbun/Getty Images

    You’ve probably read that Arctic ice is melting way faster than we thought it would. But you might not have heard of the NASA program monitoring the ice loss.

    IEEE Spectrum has a great article on the IceBridge mission, which measures the Arctic topography by sending laser altimeters on airplane flights. And the IceBridge findings paint a disturbing picture of the Arctic’s future.

    In discussing some of the recent IceBridge data at the American Geophysical Union (AGU) meeting in December, [research scientist Andrew] Barrett asked what he called a “rather crass” and “somewhat simplistic” question: “When are we going to see an ice-free Arctic Ocean?” He then answered his own question, saying that fewer than 50 percent of the models show an ice-free Arctic before 2060. But he suggests that 2030 may be a reasonable guess, given most recent observations. (Researchers treat anything below 1 million km2 as “ice-free.”)
 

    Head over to IEEE Spectrum for the full story.

    Photo courtesy of The Asahi Shinbun/Getty Images

     
  2. Jan 28th, 2013     scienceclimate changeArcticice meltNASAAGUclimate
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